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St Peter's C of E Primary School

01252 714115
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Inclusion 

St Peter's is an inclusive school and admits pupils with a variety of special and additional needs. The school always works closely with external agencies and families to ensure that individual children are supported effectively. The school will make reasonable adaptions to accommodate children's needs.

St. Peter’s C of E Primary School PROVISION MAP KS1

AREA OF NEED

WAVE 1 : Available to all pupils

Quality First Teaching

Wave 2: Catch up

Wave 3: Targeted and specific interventions

Communication and Interaction

 

 

 

 

  • Differentiated curriculum planning, activities, delivery and outcome such as simplified language and differentiated questioning.
  • Visual aids/modelling
  • Visual timetables
  • Role play
  • Toolkits
  • Pictorial symbols
  • Structured routines
  • Talk partners
  • Strategic seating and groupings

 

  • Time to talk
  • Social interaction groups
  • Emotional Literacy Support
  • Outdoor Learning Programme
  • Speech Therapy
  • Social interaction groups
  • 1:1Emotional Literacy
  • 1:1 Counselling (Home School Link Worker)

 

Cognition and Learning

 

 

 

 

 

  • Quality First Teaching including differentiated activities, delivery and outcome.
  • Clear learning intentions
  • Personalised targets
  • Peer and self- assessment
  • Interactive displays
  • Visual aids/modelling
  • Visual timetables
  • Dyslexia Friendly Classroom
  • Access to word processor
  • TA support in class
  • Targeted home learning
  • Word banks
  • Sound mats
  • Toolkits
  • Hands on equipment (bead strings/number lines)
  • Pictorial symbols
  • Structured routines
  • Talk partners
  • Talk for Writing
  • Strategic seating and groupings
  • Phonics support groups
  • Reading support groups and one to one
  • Writing focus groups
  • Five Minute Box:Maths/Literacy
  • 1:4 Numicon Maths support
  • Booster Groups 1:5 (teacher)
  • Phonics with lower year group
  • Phonological awareness programme
  • Helen Arkell 1:1 tutor
  • Apps suited to individual learning
  • SNAP Maths intervention

 

 

  • 1:1 support
  • 1:1 spellings
  • 1:2 or 1:1 Phonics Support
  • 1:1 additional Maths support
  • 1:1/1:2: Memory games

 

 

Social, Mental and Emotional Health

 

 

 

 

  • Whole school behaviour policy based on school rules
  • House points
  • Whole class rules
  • Class rewards
  • Circle Time
  • Prayer Box
  • In class worship
  • SEAL programme for PSHE
  • Outdoor Learning Programme
  • 1:2/3/4 Social Skills groups
  • Visual/Physical learning
  • 1:1 Counselling -Home School Link Worker
  • 1:1 Emotional Literacy Support
  • Personalised behaviour programme

Sensory and Physical

 

 

 

 

  • Flexible teaching arrangements
  • Staff aware of physical needs
  • Pencil grips
  • Writing slopes
  • Seating cushion
  • Jump Ahead 1:4 (motor skills)
  • Handwriting support (motor skills) 1:4
  • 1:1 OT support
  • Sensory box as appropriate

 

St. Peter’s C of E Primary School PROVISION MAP KS2

AREA OF NEED

WAVE 1 : Available to all pupils

Quality First Teaching

Wave 2: Catch up

Wave 3: Targeted and specific interventions

Communication and Interaction

 

 

 

 

  • Differentiated curriculum planning, activities, delivery and outcome such as simplified language and differentiated questioning.
  • Visual aids/modelling
  • Visual timetables
  • Role play
  • Toolkits
  • Pictorial symbols
  • Structured routines
  • Talk partners
  • Strategic seating and groupings

 

  • Social interaction groups
  • 1:4 Emotional Literacy Support
  • Outdoor Learning Programme

 

  • Speech Therapy
  • 1:1 Social interaction support
  • 1:1Emotional Literacy
  • 1:1 Counselling (Home School Link Worker)
  • 1:1 Communication/Talk support

 

Cognition and Learning

 

 

 

 

 

  • Quality First Teaching including differentiated activities, delivery and outcome.
  • Clear learning intentions
  • Personalised targets
  • Peer and self- assessment
  • Interactive displays
  • Visual aids/modelling
  • Visual timetables
  • Dyslexia friendly classroom
  • Access to word processor
  • TA support in class
  • Targeted home learning
  • Word banks
  • Sound mats
  • Toolkits
  • Hands on equipment (bead strings/number lines)
  • Pictorial symbols
  • Structured routines
  • Talk partners
  • Talk for Writing
  • Strategic seating and groupings
  • 1:6 Quest catch up reading
  • 1:2 and 1:1:Five minute box(Maths/Literacy)
  • 1:1 Numicon Maths support
  • 1:4 Numicon Maths support
  • 1:6 Phonological Awareness
  • 1:4 Phonics intervention
  • 1:5/6: Booster groups:Reading/Maths/

    Writing

  • Helen Arkell 1:1 tutoring
  • Touch typing programme
  • SNAP Maths intervention
  • 1:1: Phonics intervention
  • 1:1: Reading catch up
  • 1:1 support spellings
  • 1:2 or 1:1 Phonics Support
  • 1:1 Additional Maths support
  • 1:1/2 Memory games

 

Social, Mental and Emotional Health

 

 

 

 

  • Whole school behaviour policy based on school rules
  • House points
  • Whole class rules
  • Class rewards
  • Circle Time
  • Prayer Box
  • In class worship
  • SEAL programme for PSHE
  • Outdoor Learning Programme
  • 1:2/3/4 Social Skills groups
  • Visual/Physical learning
  • 1:1 Counselling -Home School Link Worker
  • 1:1 Emotional Literacy Support
  • Personalised behaviour programme

 

 

 

Sensory and Physical

 

 

 

 

 

  • Flexible teaching arrangements
  • Staff aware of physical needs
  • Pencil grips
  • Writing slopes
  • Seating cushion

 

  • 1:4 Jump Ahead 1:4 (motor skills)
  • Handwriting support (motor skills)

 

1:1 OT programme

 

 St. Peter’s C of E Primary School

SEND INFORMATION REPORT

 

Questions

School Response

 

 

 

1

How does the school know if children need extra help and what should I do if I think my child may have special educational needs?

St. Peter’s is a church school which has high expectations of everyone. We promote independence, respect and empathy and allow everyone to succeed within a safe, inclusive Christian community. Through an exciting curriculum, children are inspired to become lifelong learners and active world citizens.

 

Before children join the school, we communicate with nursery provisions to identify any potential additional needs. We then aim to put in interventions to ensure a good start in school. The school’s monitoring and assessment procedures are rigorous. Pupil progress meetings are held twice a term with a specific focus on children who are not making expected progress. This ensures that staff know exactly where a child is in their learning and what is needed to establish continued good progress. In this way, additional needs are highlighted and early interventions and support can be put in place. It may be that a child will only need a short-term support intervention to be back on track, but in some cases we need to plan for longer term support and more focused support. There is excellent two way communication between home and school and any concerns are discussed and acted on as a team. School strategies are made clear to parents so that they can also support their child’s progress.

 

We have in- house specialists in some areas of special educational needs. A parent who is concerned about their child’s progress should make an appointment to see the class teacher and SENCo.

 

2

How will the school support my child?

Having identified needs, we seek to match provision to needs. We aim to monitor the impact of interventions through regular meetings and continuous tracking of pupil progress. The SEN governor meets regularly with the SENCo to assess the progress of pupils on the intervention register. Interventions are measured at least twice a term to monitor impact and attendance against expected progress. The SENCo is on the leadership team and ensures that issues regarding support for children with additional needs, remain high on the school’s agenda. The SENCo reviews interventions which are taking place and ensures that those delivering interventions have the expertise to deliver them and understand the expected outcomes. Interventions are monitored carefully. If children are not making the expected progress, the interventions are reassessed and a different approach is implemented. Teachers have responsibility for their provision map and discuss this regularly with the SENCo.

Quality First Teaching is expected in all classrooms and teachers take full responsibility for the progress of all learners in their class. Lessons are suitably differentiated and resources are adapted to learners’ needs. If we feel that progress is not as expected, we are proactive in contacting parents and also in asking for additional support from Surrey. If a child needs additional support in class, this will be delivered by a TA and the class teacher. Support is delivered in different ways and may be individual or in small groups. If a child is on the school’s intervention register, the amount of support they receive will vary according to needs and progress. It is always our aim for children to make sufficient progress to come off the register and to become more independent with their learning. Success is measured by ‘progress’. Obviously children start their school learning journey at different places. It is the school’s aim that whatever the starting point, expected progress is achieved or exceeded.

Some children will need support throughout their school career in many curriculum areas. Others may only need a few prompts for a few weeks in a specific curriculum area. At St. Peter’s, it is our aim to assess each child’s individual needs and understand why progress is not being made. We seek to understand why the child is facing barriers and then we endeavour to address those barriers. Support is targeted at specific needs.

3

How will the curriculum be matched to my child’s needs?

Differentiation is embedded across the curriculum. This means that the learning is adapted to suit a child’s needs. Everyone learns best in different ways and our staff recognise this. They seek to adjust the curriculum to differing needs. Quality First Teaching is the expectation in all classes. Regular pupil progress meetings take place to ensure that pupils are on track. This will include a discussion of any barriers to learning which are holding back progress. Teachers discuss these with the Senior Management and strategies are put in place to adapt provision to suit individual learners. The school is constantly seeking to improve provision for all learners. A stimulating and exciting curriculum which makes use of the extensive school grounds and opportunities within the local community, ensures that learning takes place in a variety of settings and styles. Specialist interventions that focus on accelerating reading, developing language fluency or improving a child’s fine motor skills are examples of where support may be given. Other interventions such as social groups or one to one support for self-esteem are examples of where learning can be supported. Outdoor learning may also be a great boost for children who struggle within a more formal classroom setting.

4

How will both you and I know how my child is doing and how will you help me to support my child’s learning?

Children are encouraged to become independent learners. This means taking responsibility for their own learning and knowing what they need to do to move to the next step. Children have clear targets and are also used to self-assessing their learning. Assessment is on-going and targets are reviewed regularly. Targets are shared with parents at parents’ evening and staff are accessible on a day to day basis. If there are any concerns, these are shared with parents. Parents are also encouraged to attend meetings with Surrey support staff regarding their child’s progress. The School Development Plan is shared with parents so that they can share in the school’s vision and there are regular parent communication meetings with the head teacher. Curriculum provision is communicated each term. A reading workshop takes place for new parents and the SENCo presents to parents of Early Years children before their child joins the school so that they understand the school’s approach to special needs. The school hosts Parenting Puzzle classes to support those who may be struggling at home. A Home School Link Worker also liaises regularly with families whose children are finding aspects of school life challenging.Children with additional needs will have an Individual Education Plan which is shared with parents so that they may support the child to achieve their personalised targets.Targets on personalised education plans are reviewed regularly and shared with parents. These may be targets which need to be reinforced at home, particularly if they relate to social or personal care development.

5

What support will there be for my child’s overall well-being?

All staff are aware of the need to provide a high level of pastoral support. Any concerns will be raised with a senior staff member or the Home School Link Worker. We have a trained ELSA who supports children with behavioural, emotional and social needs. Relevant staff are trained to support medical needs. The school’s policies regarding behaviour and attendance are clear and poor attendance is supported by the Home School Link Worker. Pupil voice is encouraged and pupils’ views towards their learning and the school environment are sought regularly.

As a Church school, Christian values are brought into every aspect of school life. Children are taught to respect each other and treat everyone as an equal. Gospel values are actively promoted which results in very positive relationships between pupils and staff. Good behaviour means that children have a positive attitude to their learning. When children join the school in Early Years, they have a guardian from the upper school who becomes a friend on the playground. A programme of Personal, Health, Social and Emotional education is embedded and taught on a weekly basis. The school’s whole school approach to Spiritual, Moral, Social and Cultural learning is well developed and children are taught to respect God’s people and God’s world. They learn that they have responsibilities for their own learning and for their interactions with their peers and adults.

6

What specialist services and expertise are available at or accessed by the school?

All teachers hold qualified teacher status. We work closely with Surrey to access specialist support services such as health professionals or specialist teachers. There is an on-going programme of training and if a particular need arises, we will seek appropriate training. Current expertise includes: Emotional Support, Home Support, Language and Communication Support, Downs Syndrome support, Autistic Spectrum and ADHD understanding. Expertise will change from time to time as children’s needs change and staffing changes. We cost our interventions to ensure that we are providing value for money regarding SEN provision. Examples of specialist support services are Speech and Language Therapists, Occupational Therapist, Learning Support Services, Behaviour Support Services and Educational Psychologists. All of these professionals come into school regularly and where relevant, meet with parents to discuss strategies. The school’s Home School Link Worker offers support to both individual children and families. Freemantles can also offer support to children and families with a firm diagnosis of ASD. The school will always endeavour to seek specialist support so that each child can flourish and achieve their potential. There are however, occasions when after a great deal of support, it becomes clear that St. Peter’s is not the best possible setting for a particular child. This happens very rarely and we strive to support all children with SEND in our mainstream setting. We have on occasions, and after consultation with outside agencies sometimes had to refer a child to a more specialist setting.

7

What training have the staff supporting children with SEND had?

The SENCo holds the National SENCo Award and is a qualified teacher. We regularly include SEN issues on the programme of whole school INSETs – at least once a half term. We invest time and money in improving provision within the classroom and also whole staff understanding of SEND. Staff meetings also include regular updates on SEN issues. Staff are asked to participate in the whole school direction of SEND. There is an on-going programme of training in day to day interventions and where there are needs for more specific training to support an individual child, we seek appropriate input. This may be for a particular learning need, a physical or emotional need. Recent training has included: ELSA, ELKLAN (Communication programme), Jump Ahead (motor skills), ASD training and Numicon (Maths intervention). Individual staff attend support programmes and workshops regularly to improve their knowledge and skills for supporting individual children. If a child joins the school with needs for which we feel we do not have enough expertise, we seek to up-skill staff. All staff who come into contact with a child with SEND, are made aware of consistent approaches and the child’s IEP targets.

8

How will my child be included in activities outside the classroom including school trips?

We are an inclusive school and it is our aim to include all children whatever their need or disability in the full curriculum. Our inclusion policy promotes an understanding that all children will be included in activities both within and beyond the classroom. We use risk assessments to ensure that we are as prepared as is possible for every conceivable occurrence. If there are additional concerns regarding safety or access, parents are fully consulted and if appropriate, invited to become involved in the activity. We also make specialist arrangements for children who have additional needs to be included in residential trips.

9

How accessible is school environment?

The school aims to be accessible to everyone. As a Christian school we embrace every child as an individual and will always adapt as much as is practically possible to accommodate individual needs. A new building has a lift for wheelchair users and disabled toilets. There is disabled parking very close the school entrance. The site is secure, however it does border many gardens belonging to private householders and there are inevitably gaps in hedges and fences which we are constantly striving to secure. We always make reasonable adjustments, where reasonable, to provide for specific needs. From a learning aspect, staff are fully aware of the stipulations of the Equality Act and we welcome and respect diversity in all its forms. If a child joins whose first language is not English, we seek support from the local authority’s specialist services and when necessary, we would seek the services of an interpreter. In the same way, we will adapt our teaching to provide for a disability such as a hearing or visual impairment.

10

How will the school prepare and support my child to join the school and transfer to the next stage of education and life?

We have a robust Induction programme in place for children joining the school. There are opportunities for parents to meet with staff and with the SENCo to discuss their child’s needs before starting school. The SENCo visits feeder settings to discuss the needs of children with additional needs so that transition can be as smooth as possible. This may include arranging additional visits for specific children so that they may become familiar with the new environment and meet the adults who will be working with them. Visual material to be taken home during the summer holiday break along with simple visual timetables helps to prepare some children for the transition. This has proved very successful with children who find changes challenging or who have not developed the social skills to feel confident in a new environment. When children leave the setting, arrangements are made with the receiving schools so that transition can be planned effectively. There are a few children who need additional reassurance and who may need to visit their new setting more frequently than most children. We prepare visual material which is shared with parents so that children are prepared for any changes. If children are moving on to a specialist placement, transitions will be prepared by liaising closely with the new school and tailoring an individual plan.

11

How are the school’s resources allocated and matched to children’s special educational needs?

We use our financial resources to support the strategic aims of the school. The budget allocated to SEN is dependent upon the current needs at any time in the school and will vary from year to year. We have recently developed a provision management tool to ensure that we are providing value for money. Senior management monitors the spending on SEN and interventions are monitored to ensure that they are having impact. If it becomes clear than a child is not making expected progress, we look at alternative interventions by trying to evaluate what barriers are preventing the child from moving forward. This discussion takes place with the class teacher, support staff and the SENCo. The school ensures that resources go where most needed. At times this means moving staff around the school quite regularly to ensure that resources are invested where the needs are greatest. We adopt a flexible approach as children’s needs change and they do not all make progress at the same rate.

12

How is the decision made about what type and how much support my child will receive?

 

Quality First Teaching is an expectation throughout the school. Teachers know that they must adapt their planning and deliver their lessons to meet the learners’ needs. If additional support seems to be required, this will be discussed with the SENCo and possibly the head teacher. Parents will also be involved in that they may be able to support the intervention at home as well. If interventions do not have the expected outcome, then meetings are held to identify the barriers to learning and decide on alternative measures. If a child is not making expected progress in spite of interventions and support, the school will seek parents’ permission to involve Surrey’s Specialist Support Team. Specialists are able to review what the school is doing and in some cases, suggest alternative or additional strategies that may support the child further. In some cases, a member of the Specialist Team will work individually with a specific child. The SEN governor meets regularly with the SENCo and challenges current practice.

 

13

How are parents involved in the school?

How can I be involved?

 

The school operates an open door policy. Teachers are normally available after school. Meetings with the SENCo can be booked throughout the term and SENCo is also available at parents’ evening. Communication with families is a strength in the school and regular meetings take place regarding SEN children, if this is deemed necessary. There are regular parent focus groups, regular written communication from the school and regular questionnaires so that parents’ views can be sought. The school has a very supportive PTFA and parents who do become involved find that their experience with St. Peter’s becomes even more rewarding as they become much more involved in the school community. There are also many opportunities to help in school by volunteering to hear readers or support school trips.

If a child is receiving a visit from an outside professional, parents will be aware of this and in most cases, will have given prior permission. On occasions, parents will be invited to meetings with the class teacher and the professional. This will depend on the complexity of the child’s needs.

14

Who can I contact for further information?

Parents should contact the school office for advice on the best person to talk to regarding their child’s needs. This may be the head teacher or the SENCo. For a child already attending the school, the first contact should be with the class teacher.